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    Update on Maryland Police’s Monitoring of Peaceful Activists

    The Washington Post has an update on the Maryland Police’s monitoring of peaceful activists and designating them as terrorists in federal and state databases. The monitoring was much more widespread that earlier admitted, including bike lane supporters and people upset about utility rates increasing.

    Intelligence officers created a voluminous file on Norfolk-based People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals, calling the group a “security threat” because of concerns that members would disrupt the circus. Angry consumers fighting a 72 percent electricity rate increase in 2006 were targeted. The DC Anti-War Network, which opposes the Iraq war, was designated a white supremacist group, without explanation.

    One of the possible “crimes” in the file police opened on Amnesty International, a world-renowned human rights group: “civil rights.”

    According to hundreds of pages of newly obtained police documents, the groups were swept into a broad surveillance operation that started in 2005 with routine preparations for the scheduled executions of two men on death row.
    The operation has been called a “waste of resources” by the current police superintendent and “undemocratic” by the governor.

    Police have acknowledged that the monitoring, which took place during the administration of then-Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. (R), spiraled out of control, with an undercover trooper spending 14 months infiltrating peaceful protest groups. […]

    Meanwhile, the intelligence-gathering expanded in other directions, to activists in New York, Missouri, San Francisco and at the University of Maryland. Shane Dillingham’s primary crime, according to the six-page file classifying him as a terrorist, was “anarchism.” Police opened a file on the doctoral student in history a week after an undercover officer attended a College Park forum featuring a jailhouse phone conversation with Evans.

    Investigators also tracked activists protesting weapons manufactured by defense contractor Lockheed Martin. They watched two pacifist Catholic nuns from Baltimore. Environmental activists made it into the database, as did three leaders of Code Pink, a national women’s antiwar group, who do not live in Maryland.

    PETA was labeled a “security threat group” in April 2005, and by July police were looking into a tip that the group had learned about a failing chicken farm in Kent County and planned on “protesting or stealing the chickens.” A “very casually dressed” undercover trooper attended a speech by PETA’s president that month and waited afterward to see whether anyone talked about chickens. Nobody did.

    One Response to “Update on Maryland Police’s Monitoring of Peaceful Activists”

    1. artie Says:

      Keep all governments off the web.
      This is why we need to have real organization of web communities. So that we can make the rules, if and when they need to be made.

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