Search


  • Categories


  • Archives

    « Home

    Network World: New software lets businesses track employee Facebook, Twitter activity

    I’ve written before about how about how data from social networking sites, such as Facebook and MySpace, are being used against applicants for jobs and employees, and against applicants to colleges and graduate schools. Now, Network World reports that employers will have a new tool that makes it easy to track employees’ social-networking activity. Remember that whatever you post online, no matter the privacy controls you set in place, could be used against you, so don’t post anything that you don’t want the world to know.

    Facebook and Twitter users should probably just assume that what they post publicly is being monitored by their employer.

    If your privacy settings don’t limit content to friends only, anyone can search Google or the social networking sites themselves to see what you’re writing. Granted, that can be a tedious process that an employer may not want to bother with – but now it’s becoming easier for businesses to monitor social networking activity.

    At DEMO, a company called Teneros demonstrated a new software-as-a-service product called Social Sentry that automates the process of examining employee activity on social networking sites. […]

    Rather, the software monitors all public social networking activity in case employees reveal confidential information or make statements that could be damaging to the company’s brand. […]

    Social Sentry helps notify businesses when employees publicly discuss events that are supposed to be private, such as impending mergers. “The information is there for anyone to see, clients, investors and competitors,” [Bill Petro, Teneros vice president of technology,] said.

    Companies using Social Sentry can get a variety of alerts about employee activity on Facebook, Twitter, Linkedin, MySpace or YouTube. Alerts can be based on keywords related to products or financial results, or simply to identify foul language. “Risky employee/customer communication” is also identified, the company says.

    Leave a Reply