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    Archive for the ‘Cameras’ Category

    As COPPA Turns 20, What’s Next for Children’s Privacy?

    Monday, October 29th, 2018

    The Children’s Online Privacy Protection Act became law in October 1998, and the Federal Trade Commission promulgated its rule concerning the law in the next couple of years. It has been 20 years of ups and downs for privacy protection for children’s data. There continue to be numerous privacy challenges for parents seeking to safeguard their children’s personal information.

    As soon as they are born and are issued identification numbers, children face the risk of identity theft. Such thefts can be undetected for years, until a young adult has reason to use her Social Security Number for a loan or credit card. We have schools tracking children (and college students) with camera surveillance systems or RFID-enabled school uniforms or ID cards. Some schools started using biometric ID systems for students to pay for their lunches. There are concerns about tracking apps such as ClassDojo, which can be used by teachers and parents to monitor students’ progress.

    The FTC marked the 20th anniversary by noting it has made changes to its Rule over the years: “by amending the Rule to address innovations that affect children’s privacy – social networking, online access via smartphone, and the availability of geolocation information, to name just a few. After hosting a national workshop and considering public comments, we announced changes to the Rule in 2013 that expanded the types of COPPA-covered information to include photos, video, or audio files that contain a child’s image or voice.” Read more »

    In Schools, Camera Use Grows Beyond Security Into Evaluating Student Performance

    Friday, July 27th, 2018

    Security in school has increasingly included surveillance of schools. Previously, we discussed some schools using RFID-enabled school uniforms or cards to track students. There’s also been discussion of the use of video surveillance systems, also called CCTV for closed-circuit television, in schools. As the installation of such surveillance systems in K-12 grades and colleges and universities became widespread, officials said the systems were for improved security and to be used by school security or police. But video surveillance has begun spreading beyond security in some schools.

    Several years ago, ten schools in the United Kingdom began using facial-recognition camera surveillance systems to make sure students “have turned up, records whether they were on time or late and keeps an accurate roll call,” reported the Daily Mail. And earlier this year, India’s capital of Delhi announced that it “said CCTV will be installed in all government schools within three months” and “Parents in India’s capital will soon be able to watch their children in the classroom in real time, using a mobile phone app,” reported BBC News. (And several schools in India have used RFID technology to track students, including for attendance logs.)

    But an even more intimate use of camera surveillance in classrooms is being used in China. People’s Daily Online reports:

    The “intelligent classroom behavior management system” used at Hangzhou No. 11 High School incorporates a facial recognition camera that scans the classroom every 30 seconds. The camera is designed to log six types of behaviors by the students: reading, writing, hand raising, standing up, listening to the teacher, and leaning on the desk. It also records the facial expressions of the students and logs whether they look happy, upset, angry, fearful or disgusted.

    Read more »

    In China, a Steady March Toward Complete Surveillance of Its Citizenry

    Friday, December 22nd, 2017

    Decades ago, China began a system of online surveillance and censorship that was nicknamed “the Great Firewall of China.” Now, that firewall is getting stronger, and there is also an increase in broader surveillance of the public, and the surveillance is becoming more focused, so a particular individual could be targeted.

    China has long had a vast camera surveillance, or CCTV, system throughout the country and it includes face-recognition technology. In June, the Wall Street Journal reported that Industry researcher IHS Markit estimated “China has 176 million surveillance cameras in public and private hands, and it forecasts the nation will install about 450 million new ones by 2020. The U.S., by comparison, has about 50 million.” And the Chinese government is using pairing the CCTV surveillance systems with biometric technology “on streets, in subway stations, at airports and at border crossings in a vast experiment in social engineering. Their goal: to influence behavior and identify lawbreakers.”

    The system is powerful. BBC News recently reported that, in a test, it took China’s surveillance system seven minutes to locate and apprehend one of its reporters. Notably, China’s CCTV system isn’t the only one to integrate face-recognition technology in order to better target individuals.  Read more »

    License-plate-reader Technology Is Proliferating, And Questions Remain

    Wednesday, June 28th, 2017

    A couple of years ago, we discussed the increasing use license-plate-recognition camera technology and the possible privacy, civil liberty and security implications about the surveillance tech used to gather and record information on drivers’ movements. At the time, we noted that license-plate-reader technology (also called automated license plate readers, ALPRs), like other surveillance systems, has the ability to create a profile of an individual using personal, possibly sensitive data. Now, the technology is in even more jurisdictions nationwide, and the privacy questions remain.

    Two examples of the proliferation of the license-plate-reader technology are in Rhode Island and Tennessee. In Rhode Island, state legislators are considering HB 5531, “An Act Relating to Motor and Other Vehicles — Electronic Confirmation and Compliance System,” which would create a state-wide license-plate-reader network to identify and fine uninsured drivers. The chief sponsor is Rep. Robert Jacquard (D), who “said he has made a number of changes to address fears of growing state surveillance and concerns the cameras could be used to expand highway tolling,” reports the Providence Journal.

    The ACLU of Rhode Island testified (pdf) against the bill, noting “this legislation would nevertheless facilitate the capture and storage of real time location information on every Rhode Islander on the road, with no guidance as to how this information is to be used, at the benefit of a third-party corporation.” ACLU-RI wants the state to “implement clear and specific restrictions on the use of this technology, particularly by law enforcement” and notes such restrictions are included in HB 5989, whose chief sponsor is Rep. John G. Edwards (D). Read more »

    Be aware of privacy issues as your A.I. assistant learns more about you

    Friday, May 26th, 2017

    Update on June 6, 2017: Apple has introduced its own A.I. assistant device, the HomePod. Notably, the company says the device will only collect data after the wake command. Also, the data will be encrypted when sent to Apple’s servers. However, privacy questions remain, as with other A.I. assistants. 

    Artificial intelligence assistants, such as Amazon’s Echo or Google’s Home devices (or Apple’s Siri or Microsoft’s Cortana services) have been proliferating, and they can gather a lot of personal information on the individuals or families who use them. A.I. assistants are part of the “Internet of Things,” a computerized network of physical objects. In IoT, sensors and data-storage devices embedded in objects interact with Web services.

    I’ve discussed the privacy issues associated with IoT generally (relatedly, the Government Accountability Office recently released a report on the privacy and security problems that can arise in IoT devices), but I want to look closer at the questions raised by A.I. assistants. The personal data retained or transmitted on these A.I. services and devices could include email, photos, sensitive medical or other information, financial data, and more.

    And law enforcement officials could access this personal data. Earlier this year, there was a controversy concerning the data possibly collected by an Amazon Echo. The Washington Post explained, “The Echo is equipped with seven microphones and responds to a ‘wake word,’ most commonly ‘Alexa.’ When it detects the wake word, it begins streaming audio to the cloud, including a fraction of a second of audio before the wake word, according to the Amazon website. A recording and transcription of the audio is logged and stored in the Amazon Alexa app and must be manually deleted later.”  Read more »

    It’s Becoming Easier to Have Detailed Secret Surveillance from a Distance

    Wednesday, November 23rd, 2016

    The idea of secret surveillance from a distance isn’t new. For centuries, there have been undercover agents. Subsequently, there came hidden cameras and microphones. But there were limitations to this secret surveillance — such as the physical constraints of a human or camera located far from the person being watched. As surveillance technology has become more sophisticated, however, it is becoming easier to identify, watch, listen to, and judge people from a distance.

    The judgment portion is, in part, based on biometric facial-recognition technology that incorporates expression recognition. For the unseen eyes, it’s no longer just about identifying a person, but also about watching their emotional responses. This type of facial-recognition tech gained attention a few years ago when Microsoft filed a patent for technology that would track individuals’ emotions and target advertising and marketing as based upon a person’s mood.

    “Degrees of emotion can vary — a user can be ‘very angry’ or ‘slightly angry’ — as well as the duration of the mood. Advertisers can target people ‘happy for one hour’ or ‘happy for 24 hours,’” the Toronto Star reported in 2012. Four years later, the mood-identification technology can be bought off the shelf, as NBC News explains in a story about “a new immersive experience for moviegoers.” Read more »