Search


Intersection: Sidewalks & Public Space

Chapter by Melissa Ngo

"The Myth of Security Under Camera Surveillance"


  • Categories


  • Archives

    « Home

    Archive for the ‘Security’ Category

    NPR: Holidays Bring A New Season For Credit Card Breaches

    Monday, October 13th, 2014

    NPR reports on credit card security breaches and the upcoming holiday season in the United States:

    Though cyber thieves have stolen millions of card numbers this year, shoppers are heading into the heavy-spending season with no new credit safeguards in place. [...]

    [Bryan Sartin, who heads a team of forensic computer techs for Verizon,] says data breaches happen all the time; In fact, only about a third of them are ever made public. In midtown Manhattan, that fact surprises many shoppers, like Alexandra Goodell. [...]

    [Jason Oxman, CEO of the Electronic Transaction Association] says the magnetic stripe worked fine until the ’90s. Then came personal computers, which could counterfeit hundreds of credit cards. Because the U.S. had a strong telecom network, retailers went to an online system to verify credit cards’ authenticity. Countries where the Internet wasn’t so great adopted so-called chip cards or smart cards. Read more »

    NSA Releases Second Transparency Report

    Thursday, October 9th, 2014

    The National Security Agency, which has faced considerable criticism from the public and lawmakers since revelations by former contractor Edward Snowden concerning the agency’s broad surveillance programs, recently released its second transparency report.

     The document focuses on the civil liberties and privacy protection practices of NSA in the course of targeted signals intelligence activities under Executive Order 12333. Fair Information Practice Principles (FIPPs), the widely accepted framework of defining principles used by federal agencies to evaluate how systems, processes, or programs impact individual privacy, were used as the basis for assesssment.

    The report details numerous efforts designed to protect civil liberties and privacy protections in six of the eight FIPPs (Purpose Specification; Data Minimization; Use Limitation; Data Quality and Integrity; Security; and Accountability and Auditing). These protections are underpinned by NSA’s enterprise activities, documented compliance program, and investments in people, training, tools and technology. Read more »

    Ars Technica: Adobe’s e-book reader sends your reading logs back to Adobe—in plain text

    Wednesday, October 8th, 2014

    Ars Technica reports on a privacy and security issue concerning ebooks and Adobe’s popular Digital Editions ebooks and PDF reader (which is used by many libraries):

    Adobe’s Digital Editions e-book and PDF reader—an application used by thousands of libraries to give patrons access to electronic lending libraries—actively logs and reports every document readers add to their local “library” along with what users do with those files. Even worse, the logs are transmitted over the Internet in the clear, allowing anyone who can monitor network traffic (such as the National Security Agency, Internet service providers and cable companies, or others sharing a public Wi-Fi network) to follow along over readers’ shoulders.

    Ars has independently verified the logging of e-reader activity with the use of a packet capture tool. The exposure of data was first discovered by Nate Hoffelder of The Digital Reader, who reported the issue to Adobe but received no reply. [...] Read more »

    Reuters: Dubai detectives to get Google Glass to fight crime

    Monday, October 6th, 2014

    Reuters reports that law enforcement officials in Dubai will start using Google eyewear that includes facial-recognition technology, which raises privacy questions:

    Dubai police plan to issue detectives with Google Glass hands-free eyewear to help them fight crime using facial recognition technology, a police spokesman in the wealthy Gulf Arab emirate said.

    The wearable device consists of a tiny computer screen mounted in the corner of an eyeglass frame and is capable of taking photos, recording video and playing sound.

    The spokesman confirmed a report in Dubai’s 7 Days newspaper that software developed by Dubai police would enable a connection between the wearer and a database of wanted people.

    Once the device “recognized” a suspect based on a face print, it would alert the officer wearing the gadget.

     

    New York Times: JPMorgan Chase Hack Affects 76 Million Households

    Friday, October 3rd, 2014

    The New York Times reports on the latest massive security breach affecting individuals, this time concerning JPMorgan Chase:

    A cyberattack this summer on JPMorgan Chase compromised the accounts of 76 million households and seven million small businesses, a tally that dwarfs previous estimates by the bank and puts the intrusion among the largest ever.

    The details of the breach — disclosed in a securities filing on Thursday — emerge at a time when consumer confidence in the digital operations of corporate America has already been shaken.TargetHome Depot and a number of other retailers have sustained major data breaches. Last year, the information of 40 million cardholders and 70 million others were compromised at Target, while an attack at Home Depot in September affected 56 million cards.

    But unlike retailers, JPMorgan, as the largest bank in the nation, has financial information in its computer systems that goes beyond customers’ credit card details and potentially includes more sensitive data. [...] Read more »

    DHS Privacy Office Releases 2014 Annual Report to Congress

    Thursday, October 2nd, 2014

    The Department of Homeland Security’s Privacy Office has released its annual report (3 MB pdf) to Congress. The report focuses on the following “core activities”:

    • Requiring compliance with federal privacy and disclosure laws and policies in all DHS programs, systems, and operations;
    • Centralizing Freedom of Information Act and Privacy Act operations to provide policy and programmatic oversight, to support operational implementation within the DHS components, and to ensure the consistent handling of disclosure requests;
    • Providing leadership and guidance to promote a culture of privacy and adherence to the Fair Information Practice Principles across the Department;
    • Advancing privacy protections throughout the Federal Government through active participation in interagency fora;
    • Conducting outreach to the Department’s international partners to promote understanding of the U.S. privacy framework generally and the Department’s role in protecting individual privacy; and,
    • Ensuring transparency to the public through published materials, reports, formal notices, public workshops, and meetings.

    The report also detailed the Privacy Office’s five strategic goals for the year: Read more »