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    Archive for the ‘RFID’ Category

    As COPPA Turns 20, What’s Next for Children’s Privacy?

    Monday, October 29th, 2018

    The Children’s Online Privacy Protection Act became law in October 1998, and the Federal Trade Commission promulgated its rule concerning the law in the next couple of years. It has been 20 years of ups and downs for privacy protection for children’s data. There continue to be numerous privacy challenges for parents seeking to safeguard their children’s personal information.

    As soon as they are born and are issued identification numbers, children face the risk of identity theft. Such thefts can be undetected for years, until a young adult has reason to use her Social Security Number for a loan or credit card. We have schools tracking children (and college students) with camera surveillance systems or RFID-enabled school uniforms or ID cards. Some schools started using biometric ID systems for students to pay for their lunches. There are concerns about tracking apps such as ClassDojo, which can be used by teachers and parents to monitor students’ progress.

    The FTC marked the 20th anniversary by noting it has made changes to its Rule over the years: “by amending the Rule to address innovations that affect children’s privacy – social networking, online access via smartphone, and the availability of geolocation information, to name just a few. After hosting a national workshop and considering public comments, we announced changes to the Rule in 2013 that expanded the types of COPPA-covered information to include photos, video, or audio files that contain a child’s image or voice.” Read more »

    In Schools, Camera Use Grows Beyond Security Into Evaluating Student Performance

    Friday, July 27th, 2018

    Security in school has increasingly included surveillance of schools. Previously, we discussed some schools using RFID-enabled school uniforms or cards to track students. There’s also been discussion of the use of video surveillance systems, also called CCTV for closed-circuit television, in schools. As the installation of such surveillance systems in K-12 grades and colleges and universities became widespread, officials said the systems were for improved security and to be used by school security or police. But video surveillance has begun spreading beyond security in some schools.

    Several years ago, ten schools in the United Kingdom began using facial-recognition camera surveillance systems to make sure students “have turned up, records whether they were on time or late and keeps an accurate roll call,” reported the Daily Mail. And earlier this year, India’s capital of Delhi announced that it “said CCTV will be installed in all government schools within three months” and “Parents in India’s capital will soon be able to watch their children in the classroom in real time, using a mobile phone app,” reported BBC News. (And several schools in India have used RFID technology to track students, including for attendance logs.)

    But an even more intimate use of camera surveillance in classrooms is being used in China. People’s Daily Online reports:

    The “intelligent classroom behavior management system” used at Hangzhou No. 11 High School incorporates a facial recognition camera that scans the classroom every 30 seconds. The camera is designed to log six types of behaviors by the students: reading, writing, hand raising, standing up, listening to the teacher, and leaning on the desk. It also records the facial expressions of the students and logs whether they look happy, upset, angry, fearful or disgusted.

    Read more »

    A Step Closer More Invasive Tracking of Employees: Implanted Microchips

    Friday, July 28th, 2017

    We’ve discussed before the many ways that companies have been monitoring their employees. They’re using key-logging technology to monitor workers’ keystrokes and Internet-tracking software to log the sites that employees visit. Or tracking workers using GPS technology. More workplaces are using employee badges that have microphones and sensors for tracking individuals’ movements. Now, there’s a move toward a more invasive way to track employees: By implanting microchips in workers.

    Wisconsin technology company Three Square Market announced that it is “offering implanted chip technology to all of their employees. … Employees will be implanted with a RFID chip allowing them to make purchases in their break room micro market, open doors, login to computers, use the copy machine, etc.” The company continued: “The chip implant uses near-field communications (NFC); the same technology used in contactless credit cards and mobile payments. A chip is implanted between the thumb and forefinger underneath the skin within seconds.” Read more »

    CFPB Is Latest to Call on Companies to Build in Privacy Protections From Beginning

    Wednesday, July 15th, 2015

    There have been myriad data breaches and security problems recently with private and public sector systems. As more sensitive data is passed through more hands — corporate and government — there needs to be an emphasis on security.

    Although the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau is focused on financial data, its call for privacy protections to be built into systems from the beginning is valuable for all sectors. In the case of the CFPB, it has set out guiding principles of data privacy and security for the creation of new payment systems.

    These new systems are aimed at reducing “pocket-to-pocket” payment times between consumers and businesses or other entities. The CFPB wants to ensure any new payment systems are secure, transparent, accessible, and affordable to consumers. The systems should also have robust protections when it comes to fraud and error resolution. […]

    The CFPB wants to ensure that consumer protections are at the forefront as new and improved payment systems are developed. The protections recommended in today’s Consumer Protection Principles relate to privacy, transparency, costs, security, and consumer control. They also relate to funds availability, fraud and error resolution protections, and payment system accessibility. Read more »

    Forbes: E-ZPasses Get Read All Over New York (Not Just At Toll Booths)

    Tuesday, September 17th, 2013

    Forbes reports that a man has found that E-ZPasses, which are used to pay tolls on highways and bridges, can be read far from toll booths and used to track individuals’ locations. Privacy questions surrounding the use of E-ZPasses and other RFID-enabled toll-payment technology have been raised before, including the question of retention and sale of the data. In 2010, California Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger signed SB1268 (pdf), which affects consumer privacy. The bill’s digest explains, “This bill would prohibit a transportation agency, as defined, from selling or providing personally identifiable information of a person obtained” through that person’s use of an electronic toll payment system. The law, which went into effect on Jan. 1, 2011, also requires agencies to purge the data when it is no longer needed for billing or law enforcement purposes.

    Forbes reports that a man going by the name “Puking Monkey” decided to “hack[] his RFID-enabled E-ZPass to set off a light and a ‘moo cow’ every time it was being read. Then he drove around New York. His tag got milked multiple times on the short drive from Times Square to Madison Square Garden in mid-town Manhattan … and also on his way out of New York through Lincoln Tunnel, again in a place with no toll plaza.” Read more »

    Washington Post: Ways to thwart ID theft when traveling

    Friday, May 10th, 2013

    The Washington Post’s Navigator column discusses ways that individuals can protect themselves from identity theft when they’re traveling:

    One of the latest threats against travelers is invisible and silent: wireless attacks that siphon your credit card number, personal information and passwords. Anything with a radio-frequency identification (RFID) chip, including your passport or a credit card, can be read from afar. Thieves can also mine valuable data from your smartphone when it automatically logs on to a WiFi network.

    Fortunately, there are a few simple ways to thwart these wireless assaults, including new luggage products and common-sense steps that protect your devices and credit cards. […] Read more »