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Intersection: Sidewalks & Public Space

Chapter by Melissa Ngo

"The Myth of Security Under Camera Surveillance"


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    Update: DNI Releases Interim Progress Report on Implementing PPD-28

    Monday, October 20th, 2014

    To recap: There has been considerable controversy about the privacy and civil liberties implications of the bulk telephone data collection program revealed by former National Security Agency contractor Edward Snowden. (He revealed several surveillance programs by the agency.) The Review Group on Intelligence and Communications Technologies (created by President Obama in August after the Snowden revelations) issued a report (archive pdf) recommending against the telephone call record database. Recently, the Privacy and Civil Liberties Oversight Board (PCLOB), an independent oversight agency within the executive branch, released a report (archive pdf) on the NSA’s surveillance program that collects telephone records in bulk saying the NSA surveillance program is illegal and should be ended. Federal judges have issued conflicting rulings on the surveillance program. In January, Obama announced reforms and proposed changes to the NSA surveillance programs, including the call record database surveillance program. Obama also issued a “Presidential Policy Directive, PPD-28,” (pdf) concerning signals intelligence activities.

    Now, the Office of the Director of National Intelligence has issued an interim progress report (DNI pdf; archive pdf) on implementing PPD-28. In an announcement, Robert Litt, general counsel for the Office of the Director of National Intelligence, and Alexander W. Joel, civil liberties protection officer for the Office of the Director of National Intelligence, said the report “articulates key principles for agencies to incorporate in their policies and procedures, including some which afford protections that go beyond those explicitly outlined in PPD-28. These principles include the following: Ensuring that privacy and civil liberties are integral considerations in signals intelligence activities.”

    IT News (Australia): NSW to add offshore data rules into privacy legislation

    Monday, October 20th, 2014

    IT News in Australia reports that New South Wales Attorney-General Brad Hazzard is considering new privacy rules for the storing of data offshore:

    The office of NSW Attorney-General Brad Hazzard has confirmed the government’s intentions to update the state’s privacy legislation to make it clear where agencies and healthcare providers stand when it comes to storing data offshore, particularly as part of cloud computing arrangements.

    The NSW Privacy Commissioner, Elizabeth Coombs, finalised her draft code of practice for offshore data hosting and handed it to the Attorney-General in May this year, after a number of aborted attempts by her predecessors. [...] Read more »

    Intelligence Squared: Debate on constitutionality of mass collection of phone records

    Tuesday, October 14th, 2014

    A recent Intelligence Squared podcast debate included experts discussing whether the mass collection of phone records by the National Security Agency violates the Fourth Amendment. (This was a surveillance program revealed by former NSA contractor Edward Snowden. The program has faced considerable criticism from the public and federal legislators.) The experts are: Alex Abdo, Staff Attorney, ACLU Speech, Privacy and Technology Project; Elizabeth Wydra, Chief Counsel, Constitutional Accountability Center; Stewart Baker, former Assistant Secretary, Homeland Security & former General Counsel, NSA; and John Yoo, Professor of Law, UC Berkeley & former Justice Department lawyer. The moderator is John Donvan, Author & Correspondent for ABC News.

    Here’s the blurb on the podcast:

    Some say that the mass collection of U.S. phone records is a gross invasion of privacy. Others say that it is necessary to keep us safe. But what does the U.S. Constitution say? “The right of the people to be secure in their persons, houses, papers, and effects, against unreasonable searches and seizures, shall not be violated, and no Warrants shall issue, but upon probable cause, supported by Oath or affirmation, and particularly describing the place to be searched, and the persons or things to be seized.” Is collection of phone records a “search” or “seizure”? If so, is it “unreasonable”? Does it require a particularized warrant and probable cause? These are among the most consequential—and controversial—constitutional questions of our time.

    NPR: Holidays Bring A New Season For Credit Card Breaches

    Monday, October 13th, 2014

    NPR reports on credit card security breaches and the upcoming holiday season in the United States:

    Though cyber thieves have stolen millions of card numbers this year, shoppers are heading into the heavy-spending season with no new credit safeguards in place. [...]

    [Bryan Sartin, who heads a team of forensic computer techs for Verizon,] says data breaches happen all the time; In fact, only about a third of them are ever made public. In midtown Manhattan, that fact surprises many shoppers, like Alexandra Goodell. [...]

    [Jason Oxman, CEO of the Electronic Transaction Association] says the magnetic stripe worked fine until the ’90s. Then came personal computers, which could counterfeit hundreds of credit cards. Because the U.S. had a strong telecom network, retailers went to an online system to verify credit cards’ authenticity. Countries where the Internet wasn’t so great adopted so-called chip cards or smart cards. Read more »

    NSA Releases Second Transparency Report

    Thursday, October 9th, 2014

    The National Security Agency, which has faced considerable criticism from the public and lawmakers since revelations by former contractor Edward Snowden concerning the agency’s broad surveillance programs, recently released its second transparency report.

     The document focuses on the civil liberties and privacy protection practices of NSA in the course of targeted signals intelligence activities under Executive Order 12333. Fair Information Practice Principles (FIPPs), the widely accepted framework of defining principles used by federal agencies to evaluate how systems, processes, or programs impact individual privacy, were used as the basis for assesssment.

    The report details numerous efforts designed to protect civil liberties and privacy protections in six of the eight FIPPs (Purpose Specification; Data Minimization; Use Limitation; Data Quality and Integrity; Security; and Accountability and Auditing). These protections are underpinned by NSA’s enterprise activities, documented compliance program, and investments in people, training, tools and technology. Read more »

    Reuters: Dubai detectives to get Google Glass to fight crime

    Monday, October 6th, 2014

    Reuters reports that law enforcement officials in Dubai will start using Google eyewear that includes facial-recognition technology, which raises privacy questions:

    Dubai police plan to issue detectives with Google Glass hands-free eyewear to help them fight crime using facial recognition technology, a police spokesman in the wealthy Gulf Arab emirate said.

    The wearable device consists of a tiny computer screen mounted in the corner of an eyeglass frame and is capable of taking photos, recording video and playing sound.

    The spokesman confirmed a report in Dubai’s 7 Days newspaper that software developed by Dubai police would enable a connection between the wearer and a database of wanted people.

    Once the device “recognized” a suspect based on a face print, it would alert the officer wearing the gadget.