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    Archive for the ‘Cameras’ Category

    Privacy, Safety Problems with Use of Surveillance Gear on Romantic Partners

    Thursday, January 15th, 2015

    Recently, the Independent in the UK reported on the use of spyware by abusers to track and control their victims. “Helplines and women’s refuge charities have reported a dramatic rise in the use of spyware apps to eavesdrop on the victims of domestic violence via their mobiles and other electronic devices, enabling abusers clandestinely to read texts, record calls and view or listen in on victims in real time without their knowledge.”

    A 2009 report about stalking from the Department of Justice’s Bureau of Justice Statistics found: “Electronic monitoring was used to stalk 1 in 13 victims. Video or digital cameras were equally likely as listening devices or bugs to be used to electronically monitor victims (46% and 42%). Global positioning system (GPS) technology comprised about a tenth of the electronic monitoring of stalking victims.” (Here’s the 2012 update.) The U.S. National Network to End Domestic Violence has a paper about how abusers and stalkers use technology to control and harass their victims. Read more »

    Update: Netherlands Threatens to Fine Google Over Privacy Policy

    Tuesday, December 16th, 2014

    In the ongoing case concerning Google’s changes to its privacy policies a couple of years ago, the Netherlands announced that it will fine the Internet services giant if it doesn’t meet certain requirements by February 2015. “The Dutch Data Protection Authority (Dutch DPA) has imposed an incremental penalty payment on Google. This sanction may amount to 15 million euros. The reason for the sanction is that Google is acting in breach of several provisions of the Dutch data protection act with its new privacy policy, introduced in 2012.”

    Here’s a recap of the controversy and legal questions surrounding Google’s change to its privacy policies. In January 2012, Google announced changes in its privacy policies that would affect users of its services, such as search, Gmail, Google+ and YouTube. Advocates and legislators questioned the changes, saying that there were privacy issues, and criticized (pdf) the Internet services giant for not including an opt-out provision. The critics included 36 U.S. state attorneys general, who wrote to (pdf) Google raising privacy and security questions about the announced privacy policy changes. The EU’s Article 29 Data Protection Working Party wrote to (pdf) to the online services giant about the privacy policy changes, which affect 60 Google services. The Working Party, which includes data protection authorities from all 27 European Union member states as well as the European Data Protection Supervisor, asked Google to halt implementation of these changes while the data protection authority in France (the National Commission for Computing and Civil Liberties, CNIL) investigates. Google refused and its new privacy policies went into effect in March 2012. The CNIL investigation continued, and in January, CNIL fined the Internet services giant €150,000 ($204,000) over privacy violations. Read more »

    Boston Globe: Harvard secretly photographed students to study attendance

    Friday, November 7th, 2014

    The Boston Globe reports on a privacy controversy at Harvard University:

    Harvard University has revealed that it secretly photographed some 2,000 students in 10 lecture halls last spring as part of a study of classroom attendance, an admission that prompted criticism from faculty and students who said the research was an invasion of privacy.

    The clandestine experiment, disclosed publicly for the first time at a faculty meeting Tuesday night, came to light about a year-and-a-half after revelations that administrators had secretly searched thousands of Harvard e-mail accounts. That led the university to implement new privacy policies on electronic communication this spring, but another round of controversy followed the latest disclosure. [...] Read more »

    Associated Press: License plate data raises privacy concerns

    Thursday, November 6th, 2014

    The Associated Press reports on an issue that we’ve been hearing more about lately — privacy concerns with databases that track license-plate information.

    ROCHESTER, N.Y. – Privately owned license-plate imaging systems are popping up around Rochester and upstate New York – in parking lots, shopping malls and, soon, on at least a few parts of the New York state Thruway.

    Most surprisingly, the digital cameras are mounted on cars and trucks driven by a small army of repo men.

    Shadowing a practice of U.S. law enforcement that some find objectionable, records collected by the repo companies are added to an ever-growing database of license-plate records that is made available to government and commercial buyers. Read more »

    Virginian-Pilot: Police can require cellphone fingerprint, not pass code

    Monday, November 3rd, 2014

    The Virginian-Pilot reports on a court case in Virginia concerning the privacy of mobile devices, specifically ones that are biometrically locked with a fingerprint, such as some of Apple’s iPhones and iPads. (Note that Lifehacker has a suggested-solution for the problem of a forced unlocking of a fingerprint ID device.) The Virginian-Pilot reports:

    VIRGINIA BEACH — A Circuit Court judge has ruled that a criminal defendant can be compelled to give up his fingerprint, but not his pass code, to allow police to open and search his cellphone.

    The question of whether a phone’s pass code is constitutionally protected surfaced in the case of David Baust, an Emergency Medical Services captain charged in February with trying to strangle his girlfriend. [...]

    Judge Steven C. Frucci ruled this week that giving police a fingerprint is akin to providing a DNA or handwriting sample or an actual key, which the law permits. A pass code, though, requires the defendant to divulge knowledge, which the law protects against, according to Frucci’s written opinion.

    Eurasia Review: Interpol Facial Recognition Experts Meeting Develops Global Guidelines

    Monday, October 27th, 2014

    Eurasia Review reports that facial-recognition technology experts are developing global guidelines for the use of the biometric technology, which could have wide-ranging impact on individuals’ privacy:

    The first meeting of the INTERPOL Facial Expert Working Group brought together global experts in biometrics to begin the process of developing international facial recognition standards.

    The two-day meeting (14 and 15 October) gathered 24 technical and biometrics experts and examiners from 16 countries who produced a ‘best practice guide’ for the quality, format and transmission of images to be used in facial recognition. [...]

    INTERPOL is currently developing a facial image database with the support of Safran Morpho, a leader in biometrics in the private sector. The database is expected to become operational in early 2015, and will enhance INTERPOL’s forensic capabilities as many crimes do not have hard evidence such as DNA or fingerprints to help identify suspects.