Search


  • Categories


  • Archives

    Happy International Data Privacy Day 2015

    January 28th, 2015

    International Data Privacy Day is today. Take the time to think about how privacy is important in your life and how you can protect your rights from being infringed upon. Please also take the time to donate to any number of organizations out there trying to protect your privacy rights.

    Visit the official site to find events near your area. Here are a few highlights in the United States:

    California
    DPD San Francisco: Data Privacy Trends 2015

    W San Francisco, 181 Third Street, San Francisco, CA
    Jan 28, 2015
    The ever-growing demand for big data. Increasingly effective “bad actors,” leading to the worst year on record for data breaches. Privacy practices designed only to deal with compliance or breach response. Conflicting global privacy laws. A growing concern among consumers about who’s doing what with their data. These and other factors are impacting corporate and consumer needs and behaviors around data privacy like never before. Forrester Research predicts that privacy will be a top business technology agenda item for 2015; here’s your chance to hear candid, up-to-the-minute views from an impressive panel of leading thinkers about what matters most in data privacy for the year ahead. Read more »

    Privacy, Safety Problems with Use of Surveillance Gear on Romantic Partners

    January 15th, 2015

    Recently, the Independent in the UK reported on the use of spyware by abusers to track and control their victims. “Helplines and women’s refuge charities have reported a dramatic rise in the use of spyware apps to eavesdrop on the victims of domestic violence via their mobiles and other electronic devices, enabling abusers clandestinely to read texts, record calls and view or listen in on victims in real time without their knowledge.”

    A 2009 report about stalking from the Department of Justice’s Bureau of Justice Statistics found: “Electronic monitoring was used to stalk 1 in 13 victims. Video or digital cameras were equally likely as listening devices or bugs to be used to electronically monitor victims (46% and 42%). Global positioning system (GPS) technology comprised about a tenth of the electronic monitoring of stalking victims.” (Here’s the 2012 update.) The U.S. National Network to End Domestic Violence has a paper about how abusers and stalkers use technology to control and harass their victims. Read more »

    Data Brokers, Consumer Profiles and Privacy

    January 7th, 2015

    The Federal Trade Commission recently announced that it had charged in a federal court complaint (FTC pdf; archive pdf) that data broker LeapLab “sold the sensitive personal information of hundreds of thousands of consumers — including Social Security and bank account numbers — to scammers who allegedly debited millions from their accounts.” There is an industry for gathering data on individuals — there are data brokers such as LeapLab, Acxiom and Choicepoint, along with individual companies tracking individuals’ online and offline behavior to create consumer profiles. (Here’s a great New York Times article from 2012 that takes an in-depth look at “How Companies Learn Your Secrets.”)

    The FTC said, “data broker LeapLab bought payday loan applications of financially strapped consumers, and then sold that information to marketers whom it knew had no legitimate need for it. At least one of those marketers, Ideal Financial Solutions – a defendant in another FTC case – allegedly used the information to withdraw millions of dollars from consumers’ accounts without their authorization.” Read more »

    Note to Readers: Off for the Holidays

    December 18th, 2014

    I’m taking time off for the holidays and will resume posting here in January. I’ll be posting sporadically on Twitter, so follow me there @privacylives if you want privacy news.

    Update: Netherlands Threatens to Fine Google Over Privacy Policy

    December 16th, 2014

    In the ongoing case concerning Google’s changes to its privacy policies a couple of years ago, the Netherlands announced that it will fine the Internet services giant if it doesn’t meet certain requirements by February 2015. “The Dutch Data Protection Authority (Dutch DPA) has imposed an incremental penalty payment on Google. This sanction may amount to 15 million euros. The reason for the sanction is that Google is acting in breach of several provisions of the Dutch data protection act with its new privacy policy, introduced in 2012.”

    Here’s a recap of the controversy and legal questions surrounding Google’s change to its privacy policies. In January 2012, Google announced changes in its privacy policies that would affect users of its services, such as search, Gmail, Google+ and YouTube. Advocates and legislators questioned the changes, saying that there were privacy issues, and criticized (pdf) the Internet services giant for not including an opt-out provision. The critics included 36 U.S. state attorneys general, who wrote to (pdf) Google raising privacy and security questions about the announced privacy policy changes. The EU’s Article 29 Data Protection Working Party wrote to (pdf) to the online services giant about the privacy policy changes, which affect 60 Google services. The Working Party, which includes data protection authorities from all 27 European Union member states as well as the European Data Protection Supervisor, asked Google to halt implementation of these changes while the data protection authority in France (the National Commission for Computing and Civil Liberties, CNIL) investigates. Google refused and its new privacy policies went into effect in March 2012. The CNIL investigation continued, and in January, CNIL fined the Internet services giant €150,000 ($204,000) over privacy violations. Read more »

    Update: Digital Ad Firm PointRoll Settles with Six States Over Bypassing Safari Privacy Settings

    December 15th, 2014

    In the latest news concerning a 2012 circumvention of a Web browser’s privacy settings, New York Attorney General Eric T. Schneiderman announced that digital advertising company PointRoll — part of media giant Gannett, which owns USA Today and Gannett Broadcasting — has agreed to a $750,000 settlement with New York, New Jersey, Connecticut, Florida, Maryland and Illinois.

    To recap: In February 2012, the Wall Street Journal reported on new research by Stanford researcher Jonathan Mayer that shows four companies seek to circumvent consumers’ privacy settings in Apple’s browser, Safari. The four companies are: Google, Vibrant Media, Media Innovation Group and PointRoll. Google said the circumvention was a mistake and it has disabled the code, but there was (pdf) public criticism, including a complaint (pdf) filed with the Federal Trade Commission. Questions were raised about whether the Safari circumvention meant that Google had violated a settlement it made with the FTC last year over Google’s Buzz product. The Internet services giant had agreed to a comprehensive privacy program to settle charges (pdf) it “used deceptive tactics and violated its own privacy promises to consumers when it launched its social network, Google Buzz. In August 2012, the FTC announced Google would have to pay a minimal-for-the-Internet-giant fine of $22.5 million to settle charges that it circumvented users’ Do Not Track privacy settings in Safari. In November 2013,  Maryland announced that it joined 36 states at the District of Columbia in settling with Google for $17 million. Read more »